Anzula Books: Cloud

The designers at Stitch Sprouts have been working for months on beautiful new pattern for a second collection of books for you. Each book is a thoughtfully curated collection of 5 patterns. The books are available in print at (ask your LYS) or as e-books on Ravelry.

Barbara Benson, one of the designers featured in the books, is here to introduce you to the designs in each book. Today she shares everything you want to know about the gorgeous designs in Cloud.

Check back here or subscribe to Barbara's YouTube channel to make sure you see the videos about our other new pattern collections; Nebula and Socks!

Patterns featured in this video:

Kabeliai by Jen Lucas

Fruscio by Heather Zoppetti

Elan Hat and Elan Mitts by Triona Murphy

Cloud Street Stole by Barbara Benson

 

Book Review and Giveaway!

Jennifer Dassau’s new book, Knitting Short Rows, is chock full of technique and design. Jennifer delves into not just one or two ways to knit short rows, but five: the wrap and turn, yarnover, German, Japanese and Twin-Stitch methods. Accompanying all of these methods are 17 fantastic designs to help guide you through the world of short rows.

What are short rows, you ask? “Short-rows are exactly that: partial rows in the knitting that create curves, soft angles, and depth.” Short rows are used for anything from shoulder slopes right down to heel turns. “In garments, short-rows can be used instead of binding off stitches for shoulder or hem shaping or to add volume and length to part of the sweater.” They are particularly useful to create interest in your knitted fabric.

In her book, Jennifer explains in detail each of her methods, what they are best used for, and if any special considerations should be taken. Here is one design from each method that she utilizes in order to convey full understanding of her method.

The Wrap and Turn Method: Slices Shawl

Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

The clean lines of this modern and geometric shawl make for an eye-catching and interesting garment. It is knit in one piece, but is made up of ten “slices”. This one definitely belongs in the MOMA!

The Yarnover Method: Hemisect Mitts

Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

This design showcases how short rows can be used for seamless colorwork. These mitts are cute and comfortable, the best of both worlds!

The German Method: Buttonside Sweater

Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

Starting from the shoulders, this gorgeous sweater catches the eye with an appealing texture. The rounded hem at the bottom of this sweater finishes it off nicely, making for an attractive garment. Can’t you see yourself cuddling up in this sweater during a cold, winter night?

The Japanese Method: Welts Apart Cowl

Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

Not your standard cowl, this asymmetrical design showcases short rows by splicing stockinette stitches in between “welts” of purl. The lovely lopsidedness of this cowl will make everyone ask you how in the world you made it. Shown in Anzula For Better or Worsted in Prudence.

The Twin-Stitch Method: Rumble Strips Scarf

Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

This scarf showcases thick welted ruffles and one long cable from one end of the scarf to the other. Using this pattern may be the best introduction to short rows because of its repeats and lithe width.

If you’ve ever wanted to tackle short rows but didn’t know where to start, this is the book to get you started. And one lucky winner (international, even!) will get a copy of this book for free! Check out Knitting Short Rows on Ravlery and let us know which pattern is your favorite, and which Anzula yarn and colorway you’d use!

Pattern Roundup: Hats, hats, hats!

It's getting late in the year, which means we're quickly approaching a slew of gift giving holidays. And you're probably realizing that you should have started knitting and crocheting gifts in January in order have something for everyone on your list off the needles/hook, washed, blocked, and if you're really good, dry and wrapped in pretty paper. 

One of my favorite gifts to give is hats. Soft hats. Ones that people will actually wear because they don't feel itchy. Washable hats, because you know it doesn't matter how you much you label/instruct/beg, people are gonna throw that thing in the washer. And most importantly, hats that are than any hat the receiver has or will ever have, because it's hand made with beautiful yarn. As a bonus, most hats only take a couple hundred yards, require little blocking, and are quick to make. 

Here are a bunch of my favorites!

Owl In the Thicket Hat by Sara Burch

Owl In the Thicket Hat by Sara Burch

Oak Way by Taiga Hilliard

Oak Way by Taiga Hilliard

Fiona Hat and Fingerless Mitts by Mary Beth Temple

Fiona Hat and Fingerless Mitts by Mary Beth Temple

Sour Hat by Stephannie Tallent

Sour Hat by Stephannie Tallent

Alexin by Janet Brani

Alexin by Janet Brani

Kara-Kum by Faina Goberstein

Kara-Kum by Faina Goberstein

North Lyme by Woolly Wormhead

North Lyme by Woolly Wormhead

Cosset by Jennifer Raymond

Cosset by Jennifer Raymond

Raleigh Brin Hat by Gina Kanouse

Raleigh Brin Hat by Gina Kanouse

Tekstur by Angela Tong

Tekstur by Angela Tong

Dear Baby Francis by Carrie Sullivan

Dear Baby Francis by Carrie Sullivan

Fractals Hat by Olga Buraya-Kefelian

Fractals Hat by Olga Buraya-Kefelian

Tectonic Hat by Benjamin Krudwig (There's a knit version too!)

Tectonic Hat by Benjamin Krudwig (There's a knit version too!)

Winnimere by Becky Herrick

Winnimere by Becky Herrick

Cinnamon Sticks Hat by Lindsey Stephens

Cinnamon Sticks Hat by Lindsey Stephens

St Jean des Briques Tam by Mona Zillah

St Jean des Briques Tam by Mona Zillah

Cables n' Lace Hat by Kalliopi Aronis

Cables n' Lace Hat by Kalliopi Aronis

Barry by Lee Meredith

Barry by Lee Meredith

I know, it's a lot of hats. And if you can believe it, there are even more. Here's a link to all the great hats designed for Anzula yarns - Anzula Hat Land.

Do you have a huge gift list to fill? What are you planning to make? Tell us all about it in the comments below!