Yarn Spotlight: Breeze

Breeze in Blueberry

Breeze in Blueberry

With the summer months coming up, knit items tend to be already stored away for next winter. Never fear! Our silk/linen blend, Breeze, is just perfect for summer garments. The 35% linen helps keep things airy, while the 65% silk gives it that extra something special.

Breeze in (from top to bottom) Watermelon, Emerald, Paradise and Opal

Breeze in (from top to bottom) Watermelon, Emerald, Paradise and Opal

Breeze in (from top to bottom) Rust, Avocado and Chiva

Breeze in (from top to bottom) Rust, Avocado and Chiva

Because of Breeze's fiber content, it takes our dye softer. The muted colorways are perfect for summer! Shown here is Breeze and Squishy (our sport weight MCN), both in Watermelon, so you can see the color variation between these two lines.

Squishy and Breeze in Watermelon

Squishy and Breeze in Watermelon


Being a lace weight, Breeze tends to be a little more delicate. This makes reskeining a bit more interesting! It takes longer to reskein, but it's totally worth it to us. Plus, you get these cute yarn cakes! Don't you wish you could get one for your birthday?

This is where the magic happens... one cake at a time!

This is where the magic happens... one cake at a time!

We are lucky to have so many talented designers work on patterns for us. Here are three that we really enjoy:

Principesa Dress by Sarah Wilson
Shown in Peach

Photo credit: brewerstudios.com

Photo credit: brewerstudios.com

Wow! Isn't it fabulous? The open back, lace neck and fitted bodice are just to die for. And a dress like this, how many skeins of yarn would it normally take? Definitely more than a sweater's quantity. Not with Breeze. Most sizes take 2 skeins, while the two largest sizes take 3. What a deal!

Nesoi Tee by Miriam Felton
Shown in Lenore

Photo Credit: Miriam Felton, 2014

Photo Credit: Miriam Felton, 2014

Other than being a fantastic model, Miriam Felton is also the designer of this lovely boat neck tee. The Nesoi Tee is knit on the round in mostly stockinette, so it makes for a quick project. Again, 1-2 skeins are all you need to complete this garment in time for the summer heat!

Crucero Shawl by Laura Nelkin
Shown in Aqua

Photo Credit: Laura Nelkin

Photo Credit: Laura Nelkin

If you haven't ventured into beading with yarn, this is the pattern to try! The Crucero Shawl is the perfect addition to your summer wardrobe. It starts from the center out, which is pretty mind-blowing, and finishes with a beaded crochet edging. Fan-cy!

Be sure to check out other Breeze patterns on Ravelry and tell us in the comments which one you're dying to try!

Pattern Spotlight: Phaeodaria Socks by Hunter Hammersen

Hunter Hammersen joins us this week with the inspiration behind her newest pattern, Phaeodaria in Haiku:

I'm easily distracted. I'm sure it says something unflattering about my character, but if you ask me to do the same thing all the way down a sock, there's every chance I'll get bored and wander off somewhere around the first heel turn. Given what I hear from other knitters, I don't think I'm the only one who feels this way. These socks are my answer to that little problem.

Photo: Hunter Hammersen

The leg is one big, twisty, unapologetically intricate chart full of all sorts of cabled goodness. Now of course i understand that keeping those sort of shenanigans up through a whole sock might be a bit much (even the easily distracted among us want a break from time to time), so things do calm down a little on the foot. There you switch to a slightly more subdued cable that repeats every few rows (even then you're working a nifty center cross cable that I find unreasonably satisfying, so you won't wander off). The combination makes for a sock that holds your attention with out ever being too hard. 

Photo:Hunter Hammersen

The lovely stitch patterns (and of course the name) were taken from the drawings of Phaeodaria (tiny marine organisms with amazingly complicated mineral skeletons) in Ernst Haeckel's 1904 book /Kunsformen der Natur/. I'm a sucker for old scientific illustrations and find them a marvelous source of design inspiration!

So if you're looking for a lovely sock that will keep you entertained, Phaeodaria might be just the ticket. And if you're looking for something a bit more subdued, you can totally come raid my knitting basket. I've got a whole stack of half knit socks that would very much love to be finished!

Photo: Hunter Hammersen

More patterns by Hunter featuring Anzula yarns: 

In Case of Draughts
Argent
Interstices

What keeps you going on a project? Tell us in the comments!

Pattern Spotlight: Equal Measure by Emma Welford

This week designer Emma Welford joins us to tell the creation story of her newest design:

Some designs start with an inspiring image, others are born from a pretty stitch pattern, and sometimes the yarn itself takes center stage and tells you what to do. Such was the case with Equal Measure, which started way back in 2014 as three beautiful skeins of For Better or Worsted I took home with me from Anzula's TNNA booth. I couldn't decide between Avocado, Sexy and Hyacinth so I took one of each. These colors could go together....right? I told myself. Or am I just crazy? (The jury's still out on the crazy part.)

Photos by Lindsey Topham

I knew I wanted to use all three colors in the same design and craved something textural to elevate them past simple stripes. The crisp stitch definition of For Better or Worsted looked fantastic when I added a cable to my swatch. Garter stitch and an accent cable it is, then! Originally I planned on making all three pieces have the same color placement, but then it hit me. 

  1. I wanted to use all colors equally, rather than having excess yardage leftover on some colors.
  2. This was already shaping up to be a...funky design. Why not go all the way and play round robin with the colors?

I toyed with the debate of knitting flat vs knitting in the round. The cable on the hat spans 12 stitches, which is longer than I like any floats to cross, and to tell the truth working garter stitch in the round is not one of my favorite knitting activities. But who wants to knit small accessories flat and seam them up? Not to mention a seam would be more obvious due to the stripes, unless you really wanted to shoot yourself in the foot and alternate stripe colors as you seam. Didn't think so!

While I've done plenty of traditional intarsia, I wanted to see if it was possible to work intarsia in the round. Off a-Googling I went, and I discovered yes! It's not true circular knitting, since you're knitting back and forth in rows and joining them seamlessly as you go, but it would do the trick just fine for me with the added bonus of getting to learn a fun new technique. Don't worry, dear knitterā€”I whipped up a photo tutorial, included in the pattern, so you have your own personal reference! Equal Measure is sized to fit toddlers through adult large, making it the perfect set for your whole family. Pick your favorite colors of For Better or Worsted and let 'er knit! 

What new techniques do you want to try? What's your favorite way to learn new techniques? Let us know in the comments below!