Pattern Spotlight: Lucienne Scarf by Katy Carroll

Katy Carroll's designs are bold, full of bright colors, and usually, at least a few cables. Sounds pretty great right? She joins us today to tell about her newest pattern, Lucienne Scarf:

I was so excited to have a chance to work with Ava, Anzula's new sport weight blend. Of course, I hadn't seen Ava yet, but having knit with several Anzula yarns, and having scoped out even more of them at trunk shows, I knew it wouldn't disappoint. 

The first thing that struck me about Ava was its bouncy twist, which is one of my favorite things to discover in a yarn. While I like a lot of different knitting techniques, I'm a cable-lover at heart, and I'll always try to find a way to sneak them into designs and projects. A round yarn like this shows off cables so well, but the softness from the MCN content also gives it a beautiful drape. it was a tactile treat to knit! I also think Ava has a lot of inherent versatility, both in terms of gauge and the types of projects for which it could be used. it would make an amazing sweater!

Knowing that Ava would be released in the spring, I chose the vibrant, sunny Saffron colorway for my design. And thinking about Spring further, I knew I wanted a pattern that had an open and airy feel to it. I decided that I would incorporate dropped stitches somehow, but while dropped stitches can be fun (it feels so subversive to drop them on purpose!), they can leave the stitches on either side looking sloppy. Unless you're aiming for a deconstructed, "Matrix-y" look, that may not be what you want. This "cables and lace" motif is ideal for the purpose, though - it's bordered by decreases on either side, which keep the edges crisp and distinct. A few purl columns in between the motifs are dropped down at the end of the work, and while you don't get to enjoy that moment of transformation until the very end of your knitting, it's well worth the wait!

Ava's generous yardage allowed me to use most of all of two skeins to make a wide, lengthy scarf that could be draped loosely during transitional months, or worn more snugly in colder weather. Look for Ava's debut at VK Live in Pasadena this weekend, with the Anzula yarns at the Yarnover Truck booth 121-123! 

Can't make it to VK Live? No worries, Ava will be appearing in shops soon. If you want it even sooner you can always place a special order at your favorite Anzula shop.

Carthamus by Kirsten Kapur

If you aren't already acquainted, we are pleased to introduce you to a new design by Kirsten Kapur, Carthamus. Carthamus was created in two colors of Sebastian. 

© Kirsten Kapur 2013

© Kirsten Kapur 2013

The delicate-looking lace edging is worked first, then the project is turned and the garter stitch body is added to live stitches along the lace. Carthamus can be knit in two sizes - a long, luscious scarf for wrapping many times or just once, or a smaller shawlette that perches on the shoulders. 

© Kirsten Kapur

© Kirsten Kapur

Kirsten says she chose Sebastian for the wide variety of available colors. She prefers to choose the colors for a multi-color project in person and her LYS, Purl Soho, is a wonderful place to see many of Anzula's colorways. 

© Kirsten Kapur

© Kirsten Kapur

She also chose Sebastian because of the drape the seacell gives the yarn; with its squishable softness Sebastian is a great yarn for scarves and other accessories that will lie around the neck. 

Check out Carthamus on Kirsten's website, Through the Loops! Also click back and revisit her beautifully light shawl design done in Cloud, Thalia

© Kirsten Kapur

© Kirsten Kapur