Continuing the Little Cable Knee Highs

So now you've knit the length of the foot and are ready to start the gusset of your sock. (Not there yet? See the first post explaining our Little Cable Knee High knitalong, get the pattern from the Purl Bee, and cast on!)

Kim's Slate sock is looking comfy already!

Kim's Slate sock is looking comfy already!

The gusset is made with simple yarnover increases. Don't forget to knit the yarnovers through the back loop as with the toe. You're increasing the number of stitches around your sock in preparation to start the heel.

Sylvia is just starting to turn the heel on her Chiva sock. 

Sylvia is just starting to turn the heel on her Chiva sock. 

Once you've finished the gusset you are ready to turn the heel. Turning the heel means creating the small half-circle of stitches that makes the bottom of the sock extend to cover the heel and meet the heel flap. You turn the heel by using short rows. The Purl Bee offers a great tutorial here that takes the mystery out of this shaping technique, or check out the video at New Stitch a Day, and just wrap and turn! If this is your first time using short rows, you'll be excited to learn that you need not be intimidated, and as you use them you'll find that mastering them opens up a world of new pattern options!

Turning the heel creates the little wedge of stitches that is just under the heel flap, seen here on Charlie's Petunia sock.

Turning the heel creates the little wedge of stitches that is just under the heel flap, seen here on Charlie's Petunia sock.

One of the things that may seem strange if you haven't done this before is that you aren't knitting all the way across Needle 2 and Needle 3. Some stitches are left unknit on each side. As you follow the pattern, those stitches will be picked up. Also, during the process of turning the heel and knitting the heel flap, you are working only on Needle 2 and Needle 3. The stitches on Needle 1 will just wait until you are finished with the heel.

Up next - the leg, the cable, and the cuff. Rebecca's already finished one of her Coco socks!

Up next - the leg, the cable, and the cuff. Rebecca's already finished one of her Coco socks!

No matter what stage you're in, come join the conversation on Ravelry - we've been talking about color choices, calf increases, needle sizes, and more. As you can see from the pictures, we are all in different places in the project so come join us!

Carthamus by Kirsten Kapur

If you aren't already acquainted, we are pleased to introduce you to a new design by Kirsten Kapur, Carthamus. Carthamus was created in two colors of Sebastian. 

© Kirsten Kapur 2013

© Kirsten Kapur 2013

The delicate-looking lace edging is worked first, then the project is turned and the garter stitch body is added to live stitches along the lace. Carthamus can be knit in two sizes - a long, luscious scarf for wrapping many times or just once, or a smaller shawlette that perches on the shoulders. 

© Kirsten Kapur

© Kirsten Kapur

Kirsten says she chose Sebastian for the wide variety of available colors. She prefers to choose the colors for a multi-color project in person and her LYS, Purl Soho, is a wonderful place to see many of Anzula's colorways. 

© Kirsten Kapur

© Kirsten Kapur

She also chose Sebastian because of the drape the seacell gives the yarn; with its squishable softness Sebastian is a great yarn for scarves and other accessories that will lie around the neck. 

Check out Carthamus on Kirsten's website, Through the Loops! Also click back and revisit her beautifully light shawl design done in Cloud, Thalia

© Kirsten Kapur

© Kirsten Kapur

Sebastian giveaway with Grace Akhrem

One of the most memorable knits I saw this year at TNNA was Grace Akhrem's new Hydra sweater. The dynamic vertical lines are vivacious and sexy, and Grace's choice of Seaside and Teal really accentuates the flattering elements of her design. The sweater was created in Anzula Sebastian, our Sea Cell and Superwash Merino fingering-weight yarn. The Sea Cell gives the yarn a lovely brightness, and it is durable in the wash.

Grace is no stranger to Anzula. Her Seaweed Scarf is one of Anzula's favorite patterns! It is knit in Anzula Cricket, but it could also be knit in Sebastian.

Grace is giving away some Sebastian and a copy of the Hydra pattern to a Facebook fan on Sunday, March 24. Check out her Facebook page and “like” it to enter.