Book Review and Giveaway!

Jennifer Dassau’s new book, Knitting Short Rows, is chock full of technique and design. Jennifer delves into not just one or two ways to knit short rows, but five: the wrap and turn, yarnover, German, Japanese and Twin-Stitch methods. Accompanying all of these methods are 17 fantastic designs to help guide you through the world of short rows.

What are short rows, you ask? “Short-rows are exactly that: partial rows in the knitting that create curves, soft angles, and depth.” Short rows are used for anything from shoulder slopes right down to heel turns. “In garments, short-rows can be used instead of binding off stitches for shoulder or hem shaping or to add volume and length to part of the sweater.” They are particularly useful to create interest in your knitted fabric.

In her book, Jennifer explains in detail each of her methods, what they are best used for, and if any special considerations should be taken. Here is one design from each method that she utilizes in order to convey full understanding of her method.

The Wrap and Turn Method: Slices Shawl

 Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

 Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

The clean lines of this modern and geometric shawl make for an eye-catching and interesting garment. It is knit in one piece, but is made up of ten “slices”. This one definitely belongs in the MOMA!

The Yarnover Method: Hemisect Mitts

 Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

 Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

This design showcases how short rows can be used for seamless colorwork. These mitts are cute and comfortable, the best of both worlds!

The German Method: Buttonside Sweater

 Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

 Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

Starting from the shoulders, this gorgeous sweater catches the eye with an appealing texture. The rounded hem at the bottom of this sweater finishes it off nicely, making for an attractive garment. Can’t you see yourself cuddling up in this sweater during a cold, winter night?

The Japanese Method: Welts Apart Cowl

 Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

 Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

Not your standard cowl, this asymmetrical design showcases short rows by splicing stockinette stitches in between “welts” of purl. The lovely lopsidedness of this cowl will make everyone ask you how in the world you made it. Shown in Anzula For Better or Worsted in Prudence.

The Twin-Stitch Method: Rumble Strips Scarf

 Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

 Photo by Interweave

Photo by Interweave

This scarf showcases thick welted ruffles and one long cable from one end of the scarf to the other. Using this pattern may be the best introduction to short rows because of its repeats and lithe width.

If you’ve ever wanted to tackle short rows but didn’t know where to start, this is the book to get you started. And one lucky winner (international, even!) will get a copy of this book for free! Check out Knitting Short Rows on Ravlery and let us know which pattern is your favorite, and which Anzula yarn and colorway you’d use!